Assignment 2

After reading brief for my second assignment and it tells me that the theme has to be abstract, I am thinking on shooting childhood theme, little girl’s everyday activity. It feels like this would take me back where I was 23 years ago, as I recently change my status to mother, before this wife and etc. To look back where everything started, when I was dreaming to have a child, t be married and to become photographer…:)

However after researching documentary photography and their subjects closely another idea came up. To represent my own feelings such as loneliness, being far away from family, friends and relatives. I think this photographic idea is very popular between immigrants, everyone feels like they left something behind, then they left their country. I watched the program recently and it was a huge surprise that Lithuanian psychologists helped Lithuanian immigrants since 2009 to cope with loneliness and other related problems when leaving their country. This show us how big problem really is, people are escaping Lithuania for better life, but then has to fight with lonelyness.

Source: http://www.technologijos.lt/n/technologijos/it/S-26623/straipsnis/Emigrantus-i-Lietuva-grazinti-megins-internetiniai-psichologai?l=2&p=1&utm_source=Susije_po_straipsniu&utm_medium=Vidine_navigacija&utm_campaign=Vidine_navigacija

 

 

Assignment 1

1. Demonstration skills – I have researched quite few new breed documentary photographers, they lead me to choose the theme for assignment, I noticed that all of them are concentrating on social issues. I checked put their websites to look for new photographic designs and compositional skills. I used to love taking full frame images, but for this assignment I decided to include some close ups. With full frame images you are able to reveal more information, especially in documentary photography.

2. Quality of outcome – in my opinion the content is very unusual and interesting, obviously you can see where I am coming form and what I want to say. Some images like my subject holding ‘For sale’ sign is perfectly reflected by ‘Tesco’ cartoon. One more image which perfectly reflects theme and idea is my subject holding card where capitals big letter states ‘Illegally’ this has very strong sense of Mister Cameron words in the article. All other images help to construct coherent and discernment.

3. Demonstration of creativity – in my opinion this is the most important part as creative person can shoot any theme and create goods quality work. I think I have quite strong personal voice as I have an opinion about everything, I clearly know what I want to show and where I want to be. Some people can call my assignment, maybe racistic, but I clearly provide fact that speak out loud about only one group of immigrants (especially low class) is not fare! I tries many different camera settings as most of the places were very dark.

4. Context – I had in mind another idea for this assignment – photograph my local RSCPA centre volunteers, but after reading Maria Short’s book, I changed my mind. Decided to photograph something that I really care about and don’t think that is fare on many people. To be honest is very weird that is clearly said that someone is not welcome were, but this is exactly same situation in Lithuania, people are blamed that they left their country for easy money elsewhere. It looks like those people who work in factory has nowhere to go and no one wants them…A reserched definitely helped my to create critical thinking and good reflection.

 

Assignment 1

DSC_4646 DSC_4640 DSC_4634 DSC_4628 DSC_4596 DSC_4566 DSC_4563 DSC_4478 DSC_4510 DSC_4518

 

 

Documentary Photography

Student name: Asta Tamule

Student number: 500198

 

Assignment one

 

Local communities

 

‘You must feel an affinity for what you are photographing. You must be part of it, and yet remain sufficiently detached to see it objectively. Like watching from the audience a play you already know by heart.’

 

George Roger, British photojournalist, cited in Context and Narrative (2006) Maria Short. Switzerland AVA Publishing SA, p. 150

 

This idea helped me to decide on my assignment theme as I had intended to take in mind taking pictures at my local RSCPA center, but after reading this I suddenly had the idea of photographing my husband at work, as this is the person I know best and understand completely.

 

However, I decided to look at the political views on this assignment. The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom David Cameron speaks up about the immigration issues of the Eastern Europe. The first thing I do not agree is to publically announce about his visit to the car factory and to point out the fact that a quarter of the workers are foreign there. There are many Eastern European immigrants who have good jobs (I know plenty of such people myself).  Why not to visit places like that? In my opinion the Prime Minister in such a way wanted to show that these workers are not needed in the UK.

 

Steven Swinford, S.S. (2013) David Cameron stance on Eastern European workers inspired by car factory visit. The Telegraph.

 

‘David Cameron’s warning that Britain must “say no” to Eastern European workers by improving education for young people was inspired by a visit to a factory in his constituency where a quarter of new staff are foreign.’

 

 

Funny thing is that according to the Office for National Statistics the second biggest ethnic group is Black/African/Caribbean/Black British – 3 per cent and the other one- Asian/ Asian British/ Indians reaches 2.3 per cent. However, there isn’t any separate graph for the Eastern European. I guess another ethnic group which is only 0.9 per cent contains Eastern Europeans.

 

Source: http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/census/2011-census/key-statistics-and-quick-statistics-for-local-authorities-in-the-united-kingdom—part-1/stb-key-statistics-for-local-authorities-in-the-uk.html#tab-Ethnicity-and-country-of-birth

Another thing I found quite fascinating is the cartoon the British daily newspaper ‘The Independent’ published below.

Independent-Pic-389x247

 

 

 

I think this publication showed huge disrespect towards Lithuanians and Eastern European migrant workers.

 

After all these publications I cannot be silent, so, I decided to show that Lithuanians are not only cheap work force! My aim is to introduce a viewer to my husband: a young and promising Lithuanian who speaks perfect English and has a very good job at Wycombe Country Council as a Parking Offices Maintenance Manager. He is the only one in his team who understands everything about pay and display machines, is able to fix barriers and can also rescue people from the lifts at the car parks. He received many job offers of other companies covering parking equipment maintenance. Moreover, he has a BA in Telecommunication Engineering. Here you go, Mister Cameron, not all the Eastern European are cheap work force!

 

Source: http://www.lithuaniatribune.com/47526/furore-over-the-independents-decision-to-publish-inflammatory-anti-lithuanian-cartoon-201347526/

 

 

Assignment 1 – Exibitions

1.Wolfgan Paley

Unknown20131014-IMG_9715_A42013-094-Alyscamps-IV_A4-466x7002008-220-Karl-Behind-Bars_A4-600x896

 

 

Bibliography:

1968 Born in Remscheid, Bergisches Land, NW (DE)

1990 – 1992

studied photography at Bournemouth and Poole College of Art and Design

Awards 1995 The Böttcherstrasse Prize in Bremen

The ars viva Prize, from the Kulturkreisder Deutschen Wirtschaft

2000

Turner Prize arward (refer to: www.tate.org.uk

He has exhibited extensively worldwide and in the UK.

Source: http://www.artfacts.net/en/artist/wolfgang-tillmans-2494/profile.html

Central Nervous System

The central nervous system (CNS) is the processing center for the nervous system. It receives information from and sends information to the peripheral nervous system. The two main organs of the CNS are the brain and spinal cord. The brain processes and interprets sensory information sent from the spinal cord. Both the brain and spinal cord are protected by three layers of connective tissue called the meninges.

Source: http://biology.about.com/od/organsystems/ss/central-nervous-system.htm

The idea of this project is that all our moves, speech and thoughts are controlled by central nervous system. This is quite wide subject as CNS controls everything what human being does.

Photographer’s main subject is his close friend Karl. There are many different pieces of human body, each of them presented in a very unique way. I like shooting angles, lighting and perspective of those images. It seems like photographer tried to look for different and interesting composition of very simple things.This reminds me of Renaissance and Leonardo da Vinci paintings. Renesanse was an epocha of new findings in the painting.

The later innovators in the field, Leonardo da Vinci (1452–1519) and Michelangelo (1475–1564), who are known to have undertaken detailed anatomical dissections at various points in their long careers, set a new standard in their portrayals of the human figure (Studies for the Libyan Sibyl, 24.197.2). The patrons commissioning art in this period also came to expect such anatomical mastery.

_Leonardo da Vinci, who is without doubt the most significant artist-anatomist of all time, first undertook a series of detailed studies of the human skull in 1489, borrowing from the architect’s rigorous technique of representing three-dimensional forms in plan, section, elevation, and perspectival view. He thereby invented a new vocabulary for the history of scientific illustration. Leonardo produced his most precisely drawn dissections of the human body in 1510–11, probably working under the direction of the young professor of anatomy, Marcantonio della Torre, from the University of Pavia. None of Leonardo’s discoveries were published in his lifetime. However, his methods of illustrating the dissection of muscles in layers, as well as some of his “plan, section, and elevation” techniques, seem to have become widely disseminated, and were incorporated in the first comprehensively illustrated Renaissance treatise, Andreas Vesalius’ De humani corporis fabrica, published in Basel in 1543 (53.682). Some of Vesalius’ images of partially dissected bodies, set dramatically in a landscape, appear to have been designed by Titian’s pupil, Jan Steven van Calcar (1499?–1546).

Source: http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/anat/hd_anat.htm

2. Corrine May – May the Circle remain unbroken

 

1050573

 

 

Corrine May started her carrier by taking pictures of private life of her and her friends and relatives. She was concentrated on post-rave 90 youth and darker side of fashion world. Now is three years since she died. Her husband Mark Szaszy and her best friend Tara St Hill published May’s book and photographs.

The image above is Corrine May sitting on orange sofa.

Mark Szaszy: I remember walking into the living room one day to find Corinne sitting on the sofa in her knickers covered in feathers. Not many words were exchanged, just funny looks and the occasional sneeze. She had a twinkle in her eye as she rubbed her nose and I was just happy to be filled with the joyful wonder of her strange and beautiful ways.

This is the way May wanted to represent herself, also raise an interest in her personality and art works. We all probably agree that this image talks about her personality, she has something in her eyes that attracts viewer, also funny situation adds interest.

1050572

 

This image perfectly speaks about name of the book and exhibition. As this subject called Turbo Ride, never stops, as more and more people are willing to get a ride. This is perfect symbol for a circle.

Mark Szaszy: This photograph reminds me of elephants. I can see them whizzing around, ears flapping with the cool rush of air, all laughing and hooting, spiralling down to a slow grinding halt and unbuckling. Then shakily wandering off for chips and a hotdog. Sorry, I couldn’t resist that! It’s the sort of humour I loved to share with Corinne, who knew not to take things too seriously, especially with fashion.

1050751

 

May the circle remain unbroken is perfect example of documentary work, as May reveal things what happed around her. She definitely had her own photographic voice. I haven’t seen anything like this before, she wasn’t afraid to photograph nude friends and they were very confident around her. All May’s compositions are unique and show her talent in very strange ways.

Source: http://www.dazeddigital.com/fashion/article/17319/1/corinne-day-may-the-circle-remain-unbroken

Assignment 1 – Exercises

Exercise 1: Listen to Miranda Gavin talking about documentary photography at

 

http://www.oca-student.com/node/100125

 In your learning log, write a 200 word reflective commentary setting out your reflections to Gavin’s viewpoint.

 

Miranda Gavin is talking about what is documentary photography. In her practice documentary photography clashes with art photography. We need to specified these categories making then clear. As new technologies appeared and understanding about documentary changed, also more women coming into photography had added a value. Also many photographers tries to discover something new in the photography, show us something that is not in the frame, old and boring.

 

Documentary photography in our book called reportage, photojournalism, visual ethnography, street and travel photography. All these categories could go fall into commission or art photography category.

 

Even so experienced editor could not categorized images, as sometimes they merging into two or more categories.

 

I do not understand why people aiming to put everything into the frames, to call themselves documentary photography. In my research many photographers starts with one category then moves to another as it may be quite boring to work on one photography category all your life.

 

All in all Miranda Gavin explains that only photographer knows how he call his relationship to the photograph, as the main point is what photographer want to achieve and show to the public.

 

Exercise 2: Read the first free sections (pp. 1-8) of the essay ‘Transparent Pictures: On the Nature of Photographic Realism’ by Kendall L Walton

 

Core recourses: Walton_TransparentPictures.pdf

 

Write a 200 –word reflective commentary in your learning log outlining your views about Walton’s idea of photographic transparency.

 

http://www.oca-student.com/node/93603

 

Realism in art essentially refers to composition constructed as plainly and without interpretation as possible. The movement is generally noted to have originated from France around the 1850s. Artists sought to resist the more romantic notions represented in art and also to depict the realities of the Industrial Revolution that began during this time period. The Realism art movement continues to present day and offers depictions of highly detailed and carefully planned artwork.

Source: http://www.ehow.com/info_11372148_characteristics-realism-art.html

Renaissance – The Renaissance popularity of Humanism and classical readings, combined with the availability of literature such as Dante’s Divine Comedy, led to an interest in mythology, pagan and secular themes. Humanism emphasized the importance of education and knowledge, as well as the potential of the individual and civic responsibility. So in the Renaissance, we might see a civic mural like Ambrogio Lorenzetti’s Peaceful City, a secular mural like Raphael’s School of Athens with its themes of philosophy and science, or Boticelli’s lyrical, mythological Birth of Venus.

Source: http://www.studyarthistory.com/characteristics-of-renaissance-art-251.php

 

 

Kendall L Walton gives us his view about photography and painting differences and which one is more realistic. He starts with similar idea of Edward Steichen ‘Every photograph is fake from start to finish’. However when he needs to talk about realism, photography seems to be more realistic, as images are taken of real subject, when painting can be done using painter’s illusion.

All after all I have to agree with some points in his essay, however some of them doesn’t state real situation. I do agree that photography is more realistic, however we have so many talented painter who can duplicate real situation or person exactly as original…

Using software programs realistic image can be manipulated to suit situation.

Same could be said about paintings, painter can reveal his views on something using a brush.

In my opinion realism and documentary photography has got strong link, this exercise has been given to us to understand importance of reveling true situation or people through our imagery.

Realism made huge difference in art history, however photography is too young kind of art to be affected by this. Photography started in 1950, so paintings has much stronger history and changed with every new period.

 

Exercise 3: Read the post ‘What makes a document?’ on WeAreOCA, including all the replies to it, and write your own comment both on the blog page and in your own blog. Make sure that you visit all the links on the blog post.

 

www.weareoca.com/photography/what-makes-a-document/

 

Make sure you reply is personal and authoritative. Express your opinion on the topic of the blog and substantiate your comments with solid arguments, ideally referring to other contributions to the blog.

 

My opinion document is the fact of something happened, we see an old picture of two men, but this image doesn’t let us know how things happened, what was before and after, how this changed situation. How we can call this a document if we cannot get enough information by looking at it? This picture with no author’s comments doesn’t make document! Even then an author tells us a story, how we can be sure is true fact? There is no evidence…If it would be series of images caught people in action; we could tell this is a fact. For example someone caught steeling, this could be used as evidence in court.

This image doesn’t gives us any facts, story does…

 

Exercise 4: Make a selection of up to five photographs from your personal or family collection. They can be as recent or as old as you wish. The only requirement is that they depict events that are relevant to you on a personal level and couldn’t belong to anyone else (i.e no photographs of the Eifel Tower).

Using OCA forums such as OCA/student and OCA/Flickr group, ask the learning communities to provide short captions or explanations for your photographs.

Summarize your findings and make them public in the same forums that you used for your research. Make sure that you also add this to your learning log.

 

Link to my post:

 

http://www.oca-student.com/content/explain-photographs-write-short-captions-exercise-4-documentary

 

I found that comments was various, some of them did not even understand what I asked for! However all the images had a special sense to me, as they were from my own personal gallery. People who commented did not have this connection with people in the image, so that’s why they could not understand those in the same way as me. The best commentary was by my previous tutor – Clive White, as he worked with me for a year, so he has better understanding where I am coming from and what I want to achieve. This is a perfect example why photography critics gives us totally different written work, as each of them has his own opinion and views and they way they interpreter images.

 

 

 

Exercise 5: read the article ‘In, Around and Afterthoughts ( on Documentary Photography)’ by Martha Rosler in Bolton R. (ed.) (1992) The Contest of Meaning. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press (p.303). Make notes in your leaning blog.

 

Postmodernism is the name given to the defining artistic movement of the second half of the 20th century. Aspects of postmodernism in art and literature include surrealism, abstract expressionism, and the Theatre of the Absurd. Postmodern photography is characterized by atypical compositions of subjects that are unconventional or sometimes completely absent, making sympathy with the subject difficult or impossible. Like other postmodern artists, the champions of postmodern photography contend that it is possible to ignore the “rules” and still create art.

 

Art critics and theorists gave the name “modernism” to the art, literature, and music created during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Modernism was characterized by a rejection of previous artistic trends, such as Romanticism and a tendency toward realism. Postmodernism took this further by questioning standard definitions of “art” itself. Modernism and postmodernism were both controversial within the art world, and even the meanings of the terms themselves are the subject of debate. The general public, meanwhile, was often mystified by these works; many viewers questioned whether they were even “art” at all, which some postmodernists saw as a validation of their approach.

Postmodern painting was often characterized by an abstract, or non-representational, approach; works often appeared to be random colors or scribbles without an overriding design or meaning. Postmodern photography takes the same approach, but the medium offers special challenges for the postmodernist. The camera captures a perfect representation of whatever is in front of the lens. This means the images must be carefully chosen in order to remain abstract. Too much artifice, however, is contrary to the postmodern concept.

 

The word “banal” is often used in relation to postmodern photography. Banal means “ordinary” or even “boring.” As traditional photography focuses on subjects that are interesting, unusual, or beautiful, the choice of banal subject matter is an obvious one for postmodern photography. Again, the idea is to challenge the viewer, whether that viewer is an art critic, academic, or casual passerby. The artist asks a question or, rather, forces the viewer to ask, if the subject is ordinary or boring, whether the image is still a work of art.

 

The photographer William Eggleston has been called a consummate postmodernist. Eggleston worked with color images at a time when only black and white photography was considered “art” by critics and museum curators. While some questioned his choice of a format that was seen as common or pedestrian, its eventual acceptance made color photography a valid form for other artists to use. This illustrates how postmodern art, while sometimes controversial or confusing, has benefited the practice of art as a whole.

 

Source: http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-postmodern-photography.htm

 

The article can be found here:

 

http://education.victoriavesna.com/sites/default/files/pdfs/Rosler-In_around.pdf

 

This article introduce us with:

 

  1. History and meaning of Documentary Photography.

 

  1. Contest of Documentary Photography changed, photos of poverty and degradation are more popular as postmodernism came into scene.

 

  1. Liberal documentary still exist (magazines, books, newspapers, then more expensive moves to art galleries an museums).

 

  1. Diane Arbus – freak show photography.

 

  1. Photography from the past with the most famous photographers (war, slum, cult, foreign, poor photography).

 

  1. W. Eugene Smith keeps chasing the truth for us in words and pictures.

 

  1. Edward S. Curtis and his imagery (ethnographic costumes or travel, Indians photos) has been retouched and sold for good money.

 

  1. Can we trust photos as the documents?

 

  1. War times and no choice of photographic freedom. Photographers taken a chance to record some actions by armed solders even that this could cost their lives.

 

  1. Dorothea Lange in 1936 taken the most reproductive photograph. However subject of this photograph complained that he gets no penny of it.

 

  1. Documentary photography has two sides: Instrumental – evidence of something and conventional –historical purposes.

 

  1. Story with Thompson (picture of Dorothea Lange taken on 1936) showed us that photographers can harm incense person life by revealing who they are. This is when false names was given: Gudger, Woods and Ricketts.

 

  1.  Documentary photographers years ago reveled what was happening around and persuade viewer to take action, however nowadays photographers show us real life, with no action needed to change these things.

 

  1. Difference between sixties and eighties photography and subject matters.

 

  1. Nowadays documentary images haven’t got any new styles or no new messages compare them with 1930s.

 

  1. Author calls this era documentary photography boring, look at Bowery photography (images of flat drunk people).

 

  1. Photographic critiques issues.

 

  1.  Advertising photography is not criticized, which makes this different form other genres. However it still has it’s own viewer.

 

  1. At the end the author reveals her feminist views and thoughts.

 

I found this article interesting, but reading whole book with full contest would make some points more relevant and more understandable. Rosler covers many things, so the best idea was to write out some points what her article consists of. I like author’s comparization between documentary photography war times, and nowadays. However I do not understand why she is suppressed that photography changed, many things changed since then, documentary photography had to adapt. Rosler criticizes these days photographers, as she does not understand this, one of her least favorite photographic work – The Bowery is mentioned few times, she states that they are victims. These people photographed when they was drunk and not in the best state. Why we have to show this to the viewer? Documentary photography covers many areas, so this one is included. Then the author moves on to criticism, how and why criticism exists; also she mentions that advertising photography is not being critized. Does it have the right being called an art? Many different aspects Martha Rosler covers in her article can’t wait to rad a full book.

 

Exercise 6: Write a 25-word reflective commentary on the above quotes by Andre Bazin and Allan Sekula. Briefly compare their respective positions and record your own view on the issue of photographic objectivity. Full texts available from OCA/student Core resources: Bazin_ontologyphoto.pdf and Core resources: Sekula_PhotoMeaning.pdf

 

 

“For the first time, between the originating object and its reproduction there intervenes only the instrumentality of a non-living agent. For the first time an image of the world is formed automatically, without the creative intervention of man…in spite of any objections our critical spirit may offer, we are forced to accept as real the existence of the object reproduced, actually, re-presented… ” 

 

(André Bazin, ‘The Ontology of the Photographic Image’ in What is Cinema? 1945, p.7)

 

“If we accept the fundamental premise that information is the outcome of a culturally determined relationship, then we can no longer ascribe an intrinsic or universal meaning to the photographic image.” 

 

(Allan Sekula, ‘On the Invention of Photographic Meaning’, 1997, p.454)

 

The main issue about these two states above is photographic objectivity. Andre Bazin has very contrasted views to Allan Sekula. Bazin thinks that the camera intervenes between photographer and the scene taking all the credits, at the same time showing no creative invention or any objections. However Sekula gives his views on this saying that photographic objectivity may be compromised does not matter how long and hard photographer worked on it.

 

My opinion on this topic is that the camera does not take pictures; photographer is the one who drives his artistic skills through the camera settings. This should be said again, as in the previous exercise, everything depends on a photographer how he understands situation and what he wants to achieve by representing it to the audience. Also whom he works for as many magazines and newspaper photographers had to present news in only one way.

Some best-known photos had been set up to create propaganda, images like Capa’s millitiaman, Joe Rosenthal’s depiction of the raising of the flag at Iwo Jima and Leni Riefenstahl’s photography. This caused by change of documentary understanding and photography. As the first explanation of documentary photography was to represent information of historical events in the way they really happened.

Photography changed drastically over the times, so the photographic objectivity has not play the important role in nowadays life. If we look at advertising photography or photographs on magazine cover they do not meet reality at all.

 

Exercise 7: Read Simon Bainbridge;s article on the 2011 Hereford Photography Festival. Core resourses: Hereford_Bainbridge.pdf

 

Select one of the bodies of work in the article and write a 200-word reflective commentary in your learning log.

 

Next listen to Jon Levy, founder of Foto8, talking about documentary in the art gallery at http://oca-student.com/node/100127

 

Note down your reactions to Levy’s comments in your learning log.

 

I have decided to look at George Georgiou work for this exercise. Georgiou (1961) is British photographer, gained his photography degree at Polytechnic College London. His images for Hereford Photography Festival have been taken in Eastern Europe; his main idea was to reveal Russia influence on its soviet neighboroughs. As you known I am Lithuanian, Lithuania is based in Eastern Europe and has border with Russia. Years ago Lithuania was part of Russian, but we got our independency on 1991. So this imagery is very close to me in many ways, Lithuania still suffers from Russian occupation.

When I look at Georgiou images I see the country where I am from: old 5 floors buildings (renovation plan is already in place), people dressed in the same way (very short squirts), soviet paintings, really old cars (new cars still costs a fortune in Eastern Europe), very old clocks hanging on the wall, people living in horrible conditions and old shops. Some of these things are not so bad in Lithuania; I have to admit that Ukraine and Georgia is affected by Russia more than other countries.

All in all George Georgiou gives us an opportunity to see different angle and thematic documentary photography, we go away from aesthetic images.

 

Jon Levy’s talk:

 

Jon Levy talks about documentary photography more about photojournalism and photographers intentions. He has much experience in this area, as he is founder of photo journal based on story telling. Once again he admitted that is very hard to classified photographers as the most important thing is that photographer want to show us, what ways we wants to do this. I like his talk that he know only one photographer who clearly know his intention and what he wants to achieve, all other photographers quite not sure what is their pathway. The final sentence that we need to know photographer personally to understand his views through his imagery is very true, sometimes I feel like my tutors don’t understand where I am coming from and it our connection very weak, so I am not able to progress as much as I would like.

 

Assignment 1:

 

Local communities

 

In preparation…

 

Read the section entitled: ‘The Photographic Brief’ in Short, M. (2011) Creative Photography context and narrative. Lausanne: AVA Publishing, pp. 20-26

 

After reading Maria Short section about photographic brief it made me change my photographic theme. The best way to reveal your ideas, feelings and thoughts by knowing your photographic subject, so the best idea for me is to take photographs of my husband at work and at home, as we are new parents to 2 months old baby I will take this into consideration and will call my project ‘New life, things changed…’ Who will know better than me how he feels, what he thinks and who he truly is?

Short’s book section provides us with clear examples of documentary photography briefs, the most wonderful thing is that every photographer has his own way to reveal things or subjects, as everyone has his own feelings, views and issues he wants to speak of in photographic way. There are many tips how to handle photographic brief.

Martin Parr, MJH Studio, Christian Rodriguez, David Maurice Smith, Michael Hanson, Aechath Adam, Amanda Berg,

Research point:

 

Historical developments in documentary photography

 

  • Term ’’documentary’’ first used in 1926.
  • In 1930 concept of photographic story telling was born. 1947 Magnum was founded (famous photographers: Robert Capa and Henri- Carrtier Brensson)
  • In 1850 photography used to record moments of war (1939 -1945). The most famous photographers were Robert Fenton and Matthew Brady.
  • In 1851 – Mission Héliographiques. Few photographers sent to France to photograph images for historic sites.

 

 

Martin Parr (1952) – Magnum photographer, who showed us war time in totally different accept, he hasn’t been involved in in war zones photography. He photographed how people lived outside war zone.

Martin_Parr martin_parr_1 martin-parr-slideshow1

References:

 

http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/heli/hd_heli.htm

 

http://www.magnumphotos.com/C.aspx?VP3=CMS3&VF=MAGO31_10_VForm&ERID=24KL5357TF

 

http://www.martinparr.com/faq/

 

MJH Studio:

 

Wedding photographer, however he made few other projects, my favorite one is ‘50 Percent Stranger’. He watched strangers for a while, then he decide to ask them to be photographed, also reveals some information about them. I think this photographer broke the distance between him and his subject, as he fights the fear to take photographs of strangers. Well done! The results are amazing…

Some of the images are not high quality which is shame, I wouldn’t use them for my website…

 

Website: http://www.mjhstudio.co.uk/50-perfect-strangers/

 

Christian Rodriguez (1980, Uruguay):

 

Christian Rodriguez studied drawing and painting at ‘’Taller Dellioti’’, later gained MA in Documentary photography. One of my favorite his project is ‘’Teen Mum’’, and amazing images of women in labour, he catches the right moment when baby head arrives, that means that he must spend lots of time waiting for this particular moment (I know this form my own experience). This fact makes me wonder, there are many man who refuse to witness the labour of their own childrens and Rodriguez made this without any problems, all women are strangers to him and he does not fell that this is incorrect in many ways. I am quite surprised that these women agree to be photographed as this moment is so personal.

Website: http://www.christian-rodriguez.com/#!the-birth/c24q9

 

Zakaria Zainal (1985, Singapore) graduated from School of Communication in Nanyang Technological University. He doesn’t have photographic education, however his photographs travel around the world with exibitions. My attention caught Gurkha project, images of retired Sigapore army.This perfect documentary set as every image tells us a strory who those people were and how their life looks now.

 

Website: http://zakariazainal.com/#/Personal%20Work/Our%20Gurkhas/8/

 

 

 

David Maurice Smith

 

David Maurice Smith (1973, Canada)  – documentary photographer based in Sydney. Originally Smith has worked as support worker disadvantaged community. Then turn into photography, has many documentary photographer awards. Smith’s previous carrier showed in his photographic work, Aboriginal Community project where he tents to explore and reveal stereotypes of this community. Why I like documentary photography? Every photographer has a clear idea what to show and how to do it. Why I like new breed of Documentary photographers? As they reveal new issues and problems, that are relevant now.

 

Website: http://www.davidmauricesmith.com/#a=0&at=0&mi=2&pt=1&pi=10000&s=0&p=8

 

Michael Hanson

 

Michel Hanson (1981, United States) received many award such as World’s Top Travel Photographers and Images of the Year. Hanson photography carrier started then he finished his footballer’s carrier. There is no surprise that one of his projects cover basketball photography. However he wanted to show basketball in hi images different, so he traveled to Dominican Republic and photographed young teenager who will be signing contract with major football team. A photographer reveals strong connection with the subject, as it has been his carrier for years.

 

Website:http://michaelhansonphotography.com/P-R-O-J-E-C-T-S/DOMINICAN-BASEBALL/6/

 

Aechath Adam

 

Aechath Adam (1985, Maldives) has master’s degree in Documentary Photography. Her images are more about homelands, revealing her childhood being split between UK, Hawaii and Maldives. One of her famous project called ‘Between Windows and Walls’ where she reveals Maldives issues between migrant’s forced labor and human rights violations. Photographer take images of these people at work and home and every spare minute they have for themselves.

 

Website: http://www.instinctsandillusions.com/portfolio/permalink/366299/7670eeb44dce2a

 

Amanda Berg

 

Amanda Berg (1989, United States) graduated from Rochester Institute of Technology with degree in Photojournalism. Currently studying Experimental and Documentary Arts in Duke University. Berg’s photographic issues cover women’s football, military and civilian lives.

The most interesting Berg’s project called ‘Keg Stand Queens: Binge Drinking’ this covers women’s drinking problem in U.S., statistically females use more alcohol than men, that’s clearly showed in her imagery.

 

Website: http://www.alexiafoundation.org/stories/AmandaBerg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

References:

 

http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/heli/hd_heli.htm

 

http://www.magnumphotos.com/C.aspx?VP3=CMS3&VF=MAGO31_10_VForm&ERID=24KL5357TF

 

http://www.martinparr.com/faq/

 

MJH Studio:

 

Wedding photographer, however he made few other projects, my favorite one is ‘50 Percent Stranger’. He watched strangers for a while, then he decide to ask them to be photographed, also reveals some information about them. I think this photographer broke the distance between him and his subject, as he fights the fear to take photographs of strangers. Well done! The results are amazing…

Some of the images are not high quality which is shame, I wouldn’t use them for my website…

 

Website: http://www.mjhstudio.co.uk/50-perfect-strangers/

 

Christian Rodriguez (1980, Uruguay):

 

Christian Rodriguez studied drawing and painting at ‘’Taller Dellioti’’, later gained MA in Documentary photography. One of my favorite his project is ‘’Teen Mum’’, and amazing images of women in labour, he catches the right moment when baby head arrives, that means that he must spend lots of time waiting for this particular moment (I know this form my own experience). This fact makes me wonder, there are many man who refuse to witness the labour of their own childrens and Rodriguez made this without any problems, all women are strangers to him and he does not fell that this is incorrect in many ways. I am quite surprised that these women agree to be photographed as this moment is so personal.

Website: http://www.christian-rodriguez.com/#!the-birth/c24q9

 

Zakaria Zainal (1985, Singapore) graduated from School of Communication in Nanyang Technological University. He doesn’t have photographic education, however his photographs travel around the world with exibitions. My attention caught Gurkha project, images of retired Sigapore army.This perfect documentary set as every image tells us a strory who those people were and how their life looks now.

 

Website: http://zakariazainal.com/#/Personal%20Work/Our%20Gurkhas/8/

 

 

 

David Maurice Smith

 

David Maurice Smith (1973, Canada)  – documentary photographer based in Sydney. Originally Smith has worked as support worker disadvantaged community. Then turn into photography, has many documentary photographer awards. Smith’s previous carrier showed in his photographic work, Aboriginal Community project where he tents to explore and reveal stereotypes of this community. Why I like documentary photography? Every photographer has a clear idea what to show and how to do it. Why I like new breed of Documentary photographers? As they reveal new issues and problems, that are relevant now.

 

Website: http://www.davidmauricesmith.com/#a=0&at=0&mi=2&pt=1&pi=10000&s=0&p=8

 

Michael Hanson

 

Michel Hanson (1981, United States) received many award such as World’s Top Travel Photographers and Images of the Year. Hanson photography carrier started then he finished his footballer’s carrier. There is no surprise that one of his projects cover basketball photography. However he wanted to show basketball in hi images different, so he traveled to Dominican Republic and photographed young teenager who will be signing contract with major football team. A photographer reveals strong connection with the subject, as it has been his carrier for years.

 

Website:http://michaelhansonphotography.com/P-R-O-J-E-C-T-S/DOMINICAN-BASEBALL/6/

 

Aechath Adam

 

Aechath Adam (1985, Maldives) has master’s degree in Documentary Photography. Her images are more about homelands, revealing her childhood being split between UK, Hawaii and Maldives. One of her famous project called ‘Between Windows and Walls’ where she reveals Maldives issues between migrant’s forced labor and human rights violations. Photographer take images of these people at work and home and every spare minute they have for themselves.

 

Website: http://www.instinctsandillusions.com/portfolio/permalink/366299/7670eeb44dce2a

 

Amanda Berg

 

Amanda Berg (1989, United States) graduated from Rochester Institute of Technology with degree in Photojournalism. Currently studying Experimental and Documentary Arts in Duke University. Berg’s photographic issues cover women’s football, military and civilian lives.

The most interesting Berg’s project called ‘Keg Stand Queens: Binge Drinking’ this covers women’s drinking problem in U.S., statistically females use more alcohol than men, that’s clearly showed in her imagery.

 

Website: http://www.alexiafoundation.org/stories/AmandaBerg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research point:

 

Historical developments in documentary photography

 

  • Term ’’documentary’’ first used in 1926.
  • In 1930 concept of photographic story telling was born. 1947 Magnum was founded (famous photographers: Robert Capa and Henri- Carrtier Brensson)
  • In 1850 photography used to record moments of war (1939 -1945). The most famous photographers were Robert Fenton and Matthew Brady.
  • In 1851 – Mission Héliographiques. Few photographers sent to France to photograph images for historic sites.

 

 

Martin Parr (1952) – Magnum photographer, who showed us war time in totally different accept, he hasn’t been involved in in war zones photography. He photographed how people lived outside war zone.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

References:

 

http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/heli/hd_heli.htm

 

http://www.magnumphotos.com/C.aspx?VP3=CMS3&VF=MAGO31_10_VForm&ERID=24KL5357TF

 

http://www.martinparr.com/faq/

 

MJH Studio:

 

Wedding photographer, however he made few other projects, my favorite one is ‘50 Percent Stranger’. He watched strangers for a while, then he decide to ask them to be photographed, also reveals some information about them. I think this photographer broke the distance between him and his subject, as he fights the fear to take photographs of strangers. Well done! The results are amazing…

Some of the images are not high quality which is shame, I wouldn’t use them for my website…

 

Website: http://www.mjhstudio.co.uk/50-perfect-strangers/

 

Christian Rodriguez (1980, Uruguay):

 

Christian Rodriguez studied drawing and painting at ‘’Taller Dellioti’’, later gained MA in Documentary photography. One of my favorite his project is ‘’Teen Mum’’, and amazing images of women in labour, he catches the right moment when baby head arrives, that means that he must spend lots of time waiting for this particular moment (I know this form my own experience). This fact makes me wonder, there are many man who refuse to witness the labour of their own childrens and Rodriguez made this without any problems, all women are strangers to him and he does not fell that this is incorrect in many ways. I am quite surprised that these women agree to be photographed as this moment is so personal.

Website: http://www.christian-rodriguez.com/#!the-birth/c24q9

 

Zakaria Zainal (1985, Singapore) graduated from School of Communication in Nanyang Technological University. He doesn’t have photographic education, however his photographs travel around the world with exibitions. My attention caught Gurkha project, images of retired Sigapore army.This perfect documentary set as every image tells us a strory who those people were and how their life looks now.

 

Website: http://zakariazainal.com/#/Personal%20Work/Our%20Gurkhas/8/

 

 

 

David Maurice Smith

 

David Maurice Smith (1973, Canada)  – documentary photographer based in Sydney. Originally Smith has worked as support worker disadvantaged community. Then turn into photography, has many documentary photographer awards. Smith’s previous carrier showed in his photographic work, Aboriginal Community project where he tents to explore and reveal stereotypes of this community. Why I like documentary photography? Every photographer has a clear idea what to show and how to do it. Why I like new breed of Documentary photographers? As they reveal new issues and problems, that are relevant now.

 

Website: http://www.davidmauricesmith.com/#a=0&at=0&mi=2&pt=1&pi=10000&s=0&p=8

 

Michael Hanson

 

Michel Hanson (1981, United States) received many award such as World’s Top Travel Photographers and Images of the Year. Hanson photography carrier started then he finished his footballer’s carrier. There is no surprise that one of his projects cover basketball photography. However he wanted to show basketball in hi images different, so he traveled to Dominican Republic and photographed young teenager who will be signing contract with major football team. A photographer reveals strong connection with the subject, as it has been his carrier for years.

 

Website:http://michaelhansonphotography.com/P-R-O-J-E-C-T-S/DOMINICAN-BASEBALL/6/

 

Aechath Adam

 

Aechath Adam (1985, Maldives) has master’s degree in Documentary Photography. Her images are more about homelands, revealing her childhood being split between UK, Hawaii and Maldives. One of her famous project called ‘Between Windows and Walls’ where she reveals Maldives issues between migrant’s forced labor and human rights violations. Photographer take images of these people at work and home and every spare minute they have for themselves.

 

Website: http://www.instinctsandillusions.com/portfolio/permalink/366299/7670eeb44dce2a

 

Amanda Berg

 

Amanda Berg (1989, United States) graduated from Rochester Institute of Technology with degree in Photojournalism. Currently studying Experimental and Documentary Arts in Duke University. Berg’s photographic issues cover women’s football, military and civilian lives.

The most interesting Berg’s project called ‘Keg Stand Queens: Binge Drinking’ this covers women’s drinking problem in U.S., statistically females use more alcohol than men, that’s clearly showed in her imagery.

 

Website: http://www.alexiafoundation.org/stories/AmandaBerg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maria Short – Context and Narrative

 

Maria Short – Context and Narrative

 

This book introduces us with the things we need to consider prior every shooting: meaning of photograph, subject, audience, narrative, signs and symbols and text. All these things perfectly cover our course assignments.

 

Photograph – construction, images can be real and fake, context of photograph, importance to engage with audience through photograph.

 

Subject – choice of subject is very important to photography. If subject is not right or interesting, simply you won’t connect with audience or audience won’t be sure what you wanted to say. Also photographer has to be passionate about his work, so audience can feel this. Perfect photograph needs to be creative with the development of photographer’s belied and ethics.

 

Audience – we need to remember why we are creating photographs? Photography is three-way relationship between photograph, photographer and audience. How audience understands an image depends on photographer’s intention, connection with the subject matter, appropriate visual language, technique and presentation. Now we can see how much work we have to put in in one project or even one single image.

 

Narrative – helps to provide meaning, coherence and rhythm to the image.

 

Signs and symbols – I found this part the most important information. I remember when I was at school we read few books, where story is based on symbols and signs. As Lithuania used to be part or Russia, it was forbidden to write about political situation, so authors used other words and meanings to pass this information through to audience. This is the way to represent things in more complicated context.

 

Text – photographers won’t agree is text needs to support photographs or now. We do not want to make everything to obvious but in very difficult context is can be helpful. I have been introduced to some techniques which I never seen before, for example t combine text in the picture, it looks very interesting.

 

All in all I found this book full of useful photographic information, this is perfect for classwork as there is many exercises where you can work in-group or on your own. There is also summary after every chapter, many citations by photographers and journalists adds a value. My favorite citation is by Jean Gaumy, Magnum Photographer:

 

‘Taking pictures is like fishing or writing. It’s getting out of the unknown that which resists and refuses to come to light.’